Exhibit H.

The Common Good Covenant

A Summary of National Goals and Programs

To revitalize the society, economy and the environment of the United States


Introduction

Recent elections and public opinion polls in the United States are demonstrating the continuing unhappiness and dissatisfaction of the voting public with the presidency and with Congress. But this discontent with the political establishment is part of a world-wide trend in democracies. Governments are becoming increasingly bureaucratic, remote and unresponsive to the problems of ordinary citizens. Pork-barrel politics, corruption, pandering to narrow constituencies, emphasis on divisive "issues" -- all contribute to a political gridlock. Politics and politicians are becoming a problem, and not the solution to governing society.

The remedy for this political gridlock is administration and management -- "the application of methods accepted by all to the solutions of the problems of life in society." This approach is becoming increasingly feasible for the following reasons:

It is now feasible to outline a method to initiate a social movement for the following purposes:

A Program for the National Interest

The Need

It is becoming increasingly evident that it is essential to set a cohesive body of national goals and purposes of the United States :

The Common Good Covenant -- for the '90s and the 21st century

The following approach is proposed:

1. Use the theme of "correcting past mismanagement and misleadership"

a. Employ the systems approach in identifying problems and remedies.
b. Collect facts and information about economic and social problems, both national and world.
c. Relate these national and world problems to our national deficits.
d. Develop proposed solutions that are feasible, pragmatic and strategic (long-term) to address the problems.
e. Use policy analysis to select priorities and solutions.
f. Summarize the proposed policies and programs.
g. Work with experts to ensure feasibility by relating to budgets, voters' perceptions and the like.
h. Identify and make the program of national renewal a part of the Common Good Covenant, as a movement toward change.

Note: This approach was initiated -- 65 of these major national and interconnected world problems are identified and described, and related to tentative solutions.

2. Method of accomplishment

a. Enlist a staff (including volunteers) for elaborating the Common Good Covenant message.
b. Work with policy organizations, academia, think tanks and other sources of innovative ideas.
c. Use the proposed programs to gain support of key constituencies and activist organizations interested in economic rejuvenation and social reform.
d. Conduct an energetic public relations campaign that takes advantage of the latest communications and media technologies -- such as the Internet -- to inform and persuade the citizens to take the needed actions.

Expanding and Developing the Common Good Covenant -- The Program of National Renewal

The Common Good Covenant calls for a contract between the government offering increased opportunity while the public is assuming more responsibility. This general framework and guide for public policy development must now be expanded to meet the realities and challenges of the United States and the world.

Our extensive intellectual resources can easily form the basis of the political program needed to institute our national economic and social revival. However, even the best ideas will not be accepted without a strong motivating factor. Here the Common Good Covenant's has a powerful feature -- the emphasis on morality based on traditional American religious values. Trust in government, and a sense of community must be restored before meaningful political actions can be undertaken in creating a just and humane society.

A viable political program will require financial and other sacrifices on the part of many. A compelling moral vision of a better society is needed to justify the short-term sacrifices. The emergence of the numerous world problems again requires solutions based on justice and morality, in place of the failing New World Order. The Common Good Covenant must become the political program that satisfies the needs of the nation and the world with the resources that are available, guided by moral and spiritual considerations.

Mismanagement and misleadership of the executive and legislative branches resulted in major national and world problems, which may be summarized in the eight national deficits of:

These deficits diminish true national security, and result in a decline in living standards and a divided society unable to function as a truly United States. "The Eight National Deficits of America" gives an overview of the deficits.

Fortunately, the major national and world problems causing these deficits can be readily identified and linked with remedies to solve or at least alleviate them. The Appendix lists 65 of these major national and world problems. Their development and use is explained in the "Overview." Singly or interconnected, these problems explain our national deficits. But the problems also suggest remedies, and an opportunity to convert deficits into positive accomplishments. The "National and World Problems as Deficits" table shows how the problems are causing or are contributing to the eight deficits.

Several factors have contributed to this highly undesirable state of affairs:

Unless strong measures are taken, the United States will fail to progress relative to the rest of the world. It will not be possible to retreat into isolationism in an increasingly interconnected planet. Unresolved world problems will impact America negatively sooner or later.

With the right actions it is possible to reverse the actual or threatened decline of the United States. In the past major political realignments have taken place in response to serious threats to national unity and well-being. The current economic crisis, our unsolved and even worsening problems, the on-going world instability and environmental deterioration all demand a "transforming leadership." Such a leadership will be based on new ideas to solve our problems through coherent, balanced policies and programs.

The "Human Covenant" will be a very appropriate name for this transforming program for the '90s and the twenty-first century. The Common Good Covenant will address the 65 major national and world problems, and thereby remedy our eight deficits. It will be a coherent, cohesive and long-term strategy for the world of the new millennium and its economic, political and environmental challenges.

The Common Good Covenant should be based on ideas that are populist, pragmatic and progressive. A social movement of concerned citizens and organizations supporting the new policies and programs will ensure their adaptation by Congress, even in the face of the expected opposition by the special interests.

Implementing the Common Good Covenant through a Social Movement

In the past, social movements have emerged to achieve needed social change. A social movement is an alliance of people and organizations that share a dissatisfaction with the present state of affairs, and have a vision of a better human order. The abolition movement of the United States is probably the best example of a successful social movement.

The present condition of our society again calls for a major, reconstructing social movement. Human aggression, expressed as war and militarism, uncontrolled population growth and environmental destruction threatens human survival. Since our politicians are apparently unable to solve our problems, concerned citizens again must unite and affect the needed changes.

In recent years a number of coalitions of concerned citizens have emerged. Their interests include women's and children's issues, the budget deficit, peace and justice, environmental concerns, and the like. By incorporating their reasonable solutions into the Common Good Covenant, their support can be obtained for a transforming presidency supported by a Congress focused on the national interest.

The Eight National Deficits of America

Economists frequently discuss the twin deficits of the 1980s: the Federal budget deficit and the trade deficit. But these two deficits are only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to the problems and shortfalls of America's economy, society and environment. A comprehensive look at the continuing -- and frequently worsening -- national and world problems discloses that our political leaders and citizens ought to be concerned with eight national deficits. These are the following:

1. World Leadership Deficit

Following the decline of the Soviet Union the United States is the remaining superpower, and the only country able to influence the world in the right direction. There are many world problems, but also many opportunities, if only the right policies and programs are developed and executed. But there is a world leadership deficit, because the United States lacks a Grand Strategy for conducting its foreign affairs. A Grand Strategy would set the goal of gradually downsizing and dismantling worldwide the institutions of war and militarism, and transferring the resources to the meeting of human needs and restoring the planetary environment. Supporting development and democratization would be included in such a Grand Strategy.

2. Citizen Participation Deficit

Lack of political leadership -- both on the presidential and the congressional levels -- led to a growing disillusionment with the entire democratic process. The emergence of a political class parallels the lack of attention to addressing national and world problems. Voters are distancing themselves from the political process, as indicated by the low percentage of eligible voters registering and voting in national and local elections.

3. Moral Values Deficit

The increasing fragmentation of the American public by political mismanagement is eroding the feeling of a common nationality and citizenship. Not having a national goal and purpose, unfair taxation, perceptions of political favoritism to selected constituencies and other similar causes create a climate of indifference to suffering and deprivation. This in turn contributes to a lack of interest in solving many of our social problems. Our unresolved social problems further separate social classes, races and ethnic groups. America's "human capital" is also deteriorating, creating further weaknesses to the nation's economy.

4. Federal Budget Deficit

The $5 trillion Federal national debt and continuing budget deficits cripple the economy and society of the United States. (Although the FY 1999 budget promises a surplus, it is based on combining the budget deficits with surpluses from such trust funds as Social Security, Medicare, Military and Civil Retirement, etc.) Increasingly the massive interest payments required divert the resources needed to reduce our other deficits. The reliance on foreign investors diminishes our independence. Investments for economic growth are also reduced, causing a reduction of our standard of living.

5. Trade Deficit

The industrial decline relative of the United States relative to the rest of the world is a major cause of our continuing deficit of goods and services. International competitive positions have been lost by many industries, such as automobiles and consumer electronics. Our excessive military expenditures subsidize the research efforts of such industrial powers as Japan and Germany. Consumers find imported products of better quality and value than American ones. Consumption and a shortage of savings contribute to the trade deficit, which is increasingly financed by selling off our business assets and real estate to foreigners.

6. Infrastructure Deficit

Public investment in streets, highways, bridges, water and sewer systems and other components of our infrastructure has declined during the past decades. This in turn contributes to diminished economic productivity, and creates variations among different states and regions in ability to attract or maintain production facilities.

7. Social Deficit

We are accumulating a tremendous loss in our human capital, by having a weak education system, insufficient health care for millions, much crime and drug abuse, inadequate support of families, and other failures of our national social policies. The social deficit also increases divisions in American society that threaten the quality of life and the economic future of the nation.

8. Environmental Deficit

Careless industrial and agricultural practices are causing a mounting environmental deficit. Air, water and soil pollutants are added to the environment faster than they can be absorbed. Chemical and radioactive waste accumulations will require massive efforts to clean up. Recycling of solid household and industrial waste is still lagging. An excessive reliance on fossil fuels not only causes such problems as acid rain and the green house effect, but also threatens the living standards of future generations.


The Common Good Covenant

Addressing Critical National and World Problems

Overview

The purpose of the following section is to present national and world problems in a systematic way, and relate them to the eight major deficits of America. This in turn will enable the development of programs and policies to reduce and eventually eliminate the deficits.

The information is organized in the following manner:

  1. Each problem is on a separate page. The first half of the description focuses on the problem; the second half suggests possible or potential solutions.

  2. The organization of the problems/solutions is by:
    Policy issue area
    Policy issue
    Problem
    Solution

  3. Under each "policy issue" there could be several "problems/solutions."

  4. The source of both the Problems and Solutions information is a content analysis of publications, studies and reports.

  5. Cost of problem and cost of program to remedy the problem are shown on each page, but in most cases not filled in.

a. The purpose of showing the costs is to make sure that the problems shown are significant, i.e., ultimately could cost many billions, or even trillions of dollars to the economy or society. Some of the costs of potential hazards, or even of inactions, are simply incalculable, such as global environmental catastrophes.

b. Similarly, costs of proposed solutions are suggested, to point out that solving many of our problems will be expensive. However, in most cases there is a very favorable ratio between the cost of the problem and the benefits of solving or even ameliorating the problem. Frequently, each dollar invested in prevention can save society or the economy ten dollars or more in future costs.


National and World Problems as Deficits

C = Contributes to deficit

Policy Area Policy Issue Problem World Leadership Partic- ipation Moral Values Federal Budget Trade Infra- structure Social Environ- mental
Values Public morality Lack of national goals and purposes

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

C

- Fairness Decline in public support for fairness

-

-

C

-

-

-

C

-

- Equality Decline in public support for equality

-

-

C

-

-

-

C

-

Politics Foreign policy Lack of a national Grand Strategy

C

-

-

C

-

-

-

-

- Defense Continuing excessive spending for national defense

C

-

C

C

C

C

-

-

- Defense Continuing world-wide arms race

C

-

C

C

C

C

-

-

- Defense Lagging arms control

C

-

C

C

C

C

-

-

- Political system Government effectiveness and efficiency

-

C

-

C

-

C

C

-

- Political system Weakened functioning of political institutions

-

C

-

C

C

C

-

-

Economics Trade Unfavorable balance of trade

C

-

-

-

C

-

-

-

- Productivity Insufficient industrial productivity

-

-

-

C

C

C

-

-

- Productivity Excessive litigation

-

-

-

-

C

-

-

-

- Development Insufficient economic development

-

-

-

-

C

C

C

-

- Development Unbalanced economic development

-

-

-

-

C

C

C

-

- Development Excessive foreign investment in the economy

C

-

-

-

C

-

-

-

- Management Incompetent business management

-

-

-

C

C

-

-

-

- Management Speculative corporate takeovers and mergers

-

-

C

C

C

-

-

-

- Labor Lack of good job opportunities

-

-

-

-

-

-

C

-

- Agriculture Lack of consistent agricultural policies

-

-

-

-

-

-

C

-

- Agriculture Decline of the family farm

-

-

-

-

-

-

C

-

- Taxing Record level national debt

C

-

-

C

-

-

C

-

- Taxing Present and future deficits

-

-

-

C

-

C

C

C

- Spending Widening gap between "haves" and "have-nots"

-

-

C

-

-

-

C

-

- Spending Excessive indexation of Federal government pension payments

-

-

-

C

-

-

C

-

- Spending Benefits to senior citizens

-

-

-

C

-

-

C

-

- Monetary system Long-term inflationary trend

-

-

-

C

-

-

C

-

- Monetary system Excessively fluctuating interest rates

-

-

-

C

-

-

C

-

- Monetary system Record levels of private debts

C

-

-

C

-

-

-

Society Poverty High level of poverty population

-

-

C

-

-

-

C

-

- Poverty Resurgence in hunger and malnutrition

-

-

C

-

-

-

C

-

- Poverty Excessive homelessness

-

-

C

-

-

-

C

-

- Low-income Insufficient assistance to low-income disadvantaged groups

-

-

C

-

C

-

C

-

- Women Incomplete equal rights and opportunities for women

-

-

C

-

C

-

C

-

- Family Decline of the family

-

-

C

-

-

-

C

-

- Children Child neglect and abuse

-

-

C

-

-

-

C

-

- Crime Excessively high rate of crime

-

-

C

C

C

-

C

-

- Crime Drug abuse epidemic

-

-

C

C

C

-

C

-

- Crime Overcrowding of prisons

-

-

C

-

-

-

C

-

- Education Inadequate school system

-

-

-

-

C

-

C

-

- Education Need for lifetime education and training

C

-

-

-

C

-

C

-

- Education Adult illiteracy

-

-

-

-

C

-

C

-

Cities/regions Cities Decaying urban infrastructure

-

-

-

-

C

C

-

C

- Housing Housing supply and cost

-

-

C

-

-

-

C

-

- Transportation Decaying transportation infrastructure

-

-

-

-

C

C

-

-

- Environment Diminishing water resources

-

-

-

-

C

-

-

C

- Environment Toxic waste

-

-

-

C

-

C

-

C

- Environment Cleanup of nuclear weapons plants

-

-

-

C

-

-

-

C

- Environment Acid rain

-

-

-

C

-

-

-

C

- Environment Inadequate air quality

-

-

-

-

-

-

-

C

Science Science policy Lack of a comprehensive national science policy

C

-

-

C

C

-

-

-

- Technology Insufficient or misapplied innovation & application of science

C

-

-

C

C

-

-

-

- Health High cost of health care

-

-

-

C

C

-

C

-

- Health AIDS epidemic

-

-

-

C

C

-

C

-

- Health Alcohol and tobacco abuse

-

-

C

C

C

-

C

-

- Resources Lack of a long-term energy strategy

C

-

-

C

C

-

-

C

World Economy Lagging global economic development

C

-

-

-

C

-

-

-

- Economy Inadequate world monetary system

C

-

-

-

C

-

-

-

- Economy Unmanageable Third World debt

C

-

-

-

C

-

-

-

- Society Global mismanagement

C

-

-

-

C

-

-

-

- Society Insufficient global political development

C

-

-

-

C

-

-

-

- Society World population increase

C

-

-

-

C

-

-

C

- Society Widespread avoidable human suffering

C

-

-

-

C

-

-

-

- Society Global organized crime

C

-

C

-

-

-

C

-

- Environment Planetary deforestation and desertification

C

-

-

-

-

-

-

C

- Environment Harmful climate changes

C

-

-

-

-

-

-

C


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